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Oct 15th, 2015, 08:52 AM  
nrthldn
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Dieting issues

Hi I'm currently trying to lose 15kgs and for the past 5 weeks I've been on a diet. 4 weeks in and I lost 5 kgs but now the weight just won't shift, I've been eating healthily but I keep either putting on 1/2 pounds and losing it again so I've been around the same weight for like 2 weeks now and it's driving me insane. I don't want to lose motivation but I don't know how to start losing weight again??
Any ideas for what's going on? Thank u for any help
 
Oct 16th, 2015, 09:04 AM  
PaulB
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Am no expert but the body adapts to routine. If your weight loss system uses the same food or calories / day vary it a bit. Push past the plateau. Also if your calories are too low your body will stall your metabolism and stop your weight loss. Survival system kicks in. It seems to be a matter of finding that balance point between getting enough nutrition, so that your body knows food is abundant, yet eating only enough to reduce the fat stores. Which am guessing is as much about what you eat as compared to how much. Could try adding a cheat meal or a fast day depending on what your routine consists of. Whatever you do just remember to make sure it is something that you can live with so when you have lost your 15kg and go back to 'normal' eating you have changed enough to maintain the loss. Hope some of that helps and good luck.
 
Oct 16th, 2015, 11:40 AM  
Wobbles
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Hi nrthldn,

You've hit a plateau, unfortunately that's normal yet frustrating ... you can't allow it to beat you, for now you are maintaining, you don't want to gain right?

Our bodies get used to the same routine. What plan/method are you using to lose weight? ARe you exercising also?
 
 
Oct 17th, 2015, 14:27 PM  
nrthldn
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I have been eating different everyday, one day carbs n vegetables or one day protein and vegetables but I kept on putting weight and then losing it but constantly around the same weight. For the last 2 days I have been only eating 1 meal a day and have lost around 2 kgs, I don't want to keep doing this because I won't survive on 1 meal a day forever but any other way and the weight just won't shift
Quote:
Quote by PaulB View Post
Am no expert but the body adapts to routine. If your weight loss system uses the same food or calories / day vary it a bit. Push past the plateau. Also if your calories are too low your body will stall your metabolism and stop your weight loss. Survival system kicks in. It seems to be a matter of finding that balance point between getting enough nutrition, so that your body knows food is abundant, yet eating only enough to reduce the fat stores. Which am guessing is as much about what you eat as compared to how much. Could try adding a cheat meal or a fast day depending on what your routine consists of. Whatever you do just remember to make sure it is something that you can live with so when you have lost your 15kg and go back to 'normal' eating you have changed enough to maintain the loss. Hope some of that helps and good luck.
 
Oct 17th, 2015, 14:31 PM  
nrthldn
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I wouldn't say I'm maintaining, the weight goes up and down 1/2kgs everyday but not anymore. It's so frustrating, I do not want to gain weight.
Usually I would stick with 1 food group and vegetables everyday so for example protein and vegetables for 1 day and carbs and vegetables for another day but for the last 2 days I have been only eating 1 meal a day and have lost around 2 kgs, I don't want to keep doing this because I won't survive on 1 meal a day forever but any other way and the weight just won't shift. I have been doing some exercise also, about 30 mins a day.
I don't know what to do, it's driving me crazy
Quote:
Quote by Wobbles View Post
Hi nrthldn,

You've hit a plateau, unfortunately that's normal yet frustrating ... you can't allow it to beat you, for now you are maintaining, you don't want to gain right?

Our bodies get used to the same routine. What plan/method are you using to lose weight? ARe you exercising also?
 
Oct 17th, 2015, 22:06 PM  
700clair
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Dieting issues

I have lost 6 stone in 2 years. Throughout my journey there are times when I have maintained no matter how on plan I am.
I found reducing meal sizes and upping your body magic kicks started me again.
 
Oct 18th, 2015, 02:09 AM  
MrNiceGuy
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Hi nrthldn,

Upon commencing calorie controlled diets, the sense of elation experienced in the first few weeks can quickly turn into one of frustration and despair if the weight loss seemingly fails to continue.

However, in order to help provide a little perspective, consider that the excess wasn't gained overnight, so it's certainly not going to be shed overnight either.

To a larger degree (no pun intended), the ability to continually lose weight is dictated by numbers, but you need to know what those numbers are at the outset in order to ensure continued success.

To gain an understanding of those numbers, if you've not already done so, I'd recommend that you calculate your basal metabolic rate (BMR).

By calculating your BMR, you can obtain a clearer idea of how many daily calories you need to consume, using the figure as a starting point to introduce a calorie deficit, since the calculation takes a number of different factors into consideration, ranging from age, weight, height and current levels of activity.

Use the following equation below to calculate your resting BMR:

(Women) BMR = 655 + (9.6 x weight in kg) + (1.8 x height in cm) – (4.7 x age in yrs).

(Men) BMR = 10 x weight (kg) + 6.25 x height (cm) – 5 x age (years) + 5

Having obtained your resting BMR, based upon your current level of activity, multiply that figure by one of the following, in order to ascertain your total daily calorie requirements (to maintain current weight).

Sedentary: TDEE = BMR x 1.2
Lightly Active: TDEE = BMR x 1.375
Moderately Active: TDEE = BMR x 1.55
Very Active: TDEE = BMR x 1.725
Extremely Active TDEE = BMR x 1.9

Having obtained the figure required to maintain weight, reduce your daily calorie intake by approximately 500Kcal. Your current level of weekly exercise will also increase the calorie deficit even further, allowing you to lose weight sensibly (approx 1-3lbs per week).

As your body weight decreases, you'll need to regularly re-calculate your BMR, in order to ensure that you're not consuming more calories than you need.

However, in order to enjoy continued weight loss, you also need to consume a healthy and varied diet (one that routinely avoids calorie dense foods such as crisps, sweets and pastries). Additionally, move away from the practice of eating only set food groups on certain days, especially since you've begun to exercise, as your depleted glycogen reserves will need to be replenished (carbs aren't the enemy they're made out to be).

By all means, don’t deprive yourself of the odd treat, but if you’re eating healthily, you’ll soon kick-start your weight loss once again.

Most importantly, though, make sure you eat breakfast in the morning.

In addition to improving your fitness, regardless of it's level of intensity, regular exercise also increases your sensitivity to insulin. An increase in insulin sensitivity reduces the amount needed to 'unlock the door' meaning that more glucose is able to enter the muscle (to replenish depleted reserves), leaving less glucose circulating in the blood-stream to be stored as fat. Increased insulin sensitivity also reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Consequently, the higher the exercise intensity, the greater the increase in insulin sensitivity, due to the increased uptake of glucose throughout, hence the reason HIIT programs have risen to such prominence in recent years.

I'm not suggesting that you should immediately seek to incorporate HIIT into your current exercise regime. However, once your fitness level improves sufficiently, it's definitely something you should consider, since HIIT is both challenging and rewarding in equal measure.
 
 
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